Bach Centennial Mouthpieces @ Osmun

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The year 2018 represents a milestone in the history of Vincent Bach manufacturing. Having started his business in 1918, master craftsman Vincent Bach created a legacy that has continued over the last 100 years. Bach Brass is celebrating the Centennial with two limited edition mouthpieces.

The Trumpet mouthpiece is a 3C Cup with a 27 Throat, 10 Backbore, and Gold-Plated 100th Anniversary Engraving.

http://osmun.com/bach-centennial-trumpet-mpc/

The Trombone mouthpiece is a Gold-Plated Large Shank 5G with the 100th Anniversary Engraving.

http://osmun.com/bach-centennial-trombone-mpc/

Made in the USA. The Centennial Mouthpieces are made to order by Bach and are in limited production. Get yours before it’s too late!

We Go the Extra Mile

Osmun Music Trumpet Specialist Jim Becker

Osmun Music Trumpet Specialist Jim Becker

Jim Becker, our ace trumpet tech, just got a nice shout-out from a happy customer on the Trumpet Herald (Here’s the link):

Hi All — Last year I had Jim Becker at Osmun do a valve job on my 1968 Olds Special. He turned a “Special” into a “Fantastic.” This past week, he did a valve job on my 1954 Olds Recording, with the same result. The horn is the off-the-map good. In my view, for a vintage horn, there’s no bigger bang-for-the-buck than a valve job, as long as the rest of the horn is sound. Jim also goes the extra mile, always finding other things to correct along the way (my Recording came back with the bell straightened out and with O-rings on the third valve slide). He’s an expert’s expert, fair in pricing, and a nice person to boot. Thanks, Jim!

Be sure to check out the Trumpet Services page at osmun.com.

Blueprinting

Why Are Some Trumpets Better Than Others?

As far back as I can remember, it’s been an article of faith for trumpet players: To get a good trumpet, go somewhere where you can try a lot of identical instruments and pick out the good one. That used to work, sort of. Years ago, large stores, and even some smaller ones carried multiple samples of the same instrument which they would dutifully roll out to be tried. The problem was that, unless you happened to be there when a new shipment arrived, you could safely assume that the trumpets you were trying had already been picked over by numerous players. Plus, it can be very difficult to access small differences in a short time span and in an unfamiliar acoustic. Now days it’s pretty much a moot point. The economics of the music business make carrying a large stock of instruments a losing proposition. Continue reading