Our Mouthpiece Range Expands With the LS Rim

Click here to go to the store Click here to go to the rims ordering page

We’ve added a new rim model to our offerings. The LS rim is a copy of the Laskey rim. Our goal was to make it easy for players who are accustomed to Laskey rims to try different cups, ours and those of other makers.

The LS is a medium width rim, with a rounded contour.  The LS75 inner edge and crown are virtually identical to our 7S rim, which is itself a copy of a Bach 7S. The only significant difference is in the wider contour on the outside of the 7S. This would not be felt by anyone except those using a very pronounced einsetzen embouchure.

We’ve made our rims in the same sizes as Laskey: 17 to 18.5mm, in .25mm steps and marked them with Laskey’s numbering system.  Our measurements are slightly smaller because we measure all our rims at .050″ down from the crown. Laskey’s are measured slightly higher (.035″) so they measure a little wider. Models 70 to 775 fit our standard cups and any cup with a 750-36 Giardinelli-compatible thread. The 80-85 rims fit our metric series and any PHC cup.

Visit our Osmun Mouthpieces Pages to see all the cups and rims we offer.

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How to Choose a New Mouthpiece

It never ceases to amaze me when I see a horn player come into the shop with a new, very expensive instrument, who’s playing it with a mouthpiece that someone gave him or her in high school or a teacher fished out of his junk drawer. It seems almost like an afterthought. It shouldn’t be. The mouthpiece is the interface between the player and their instrument and choosing the right one can make a dramatic difference.

Choosing a new mouthpiece can be a daunting task. But, it doesn’t have to be. Every mouthpiece needs to meet three requirements: 1. It has to suit the player, 2. It has to suit the horn, 3. It has to produce the desired sound and response.

The first step is to find the right rim. It should be comfortable and allow clean articulation and a smooth legato. The inner diameter of the rim can vary to suit thick or thin lips or to accommodate uneven teeth. A wider ID (inner diameter) allows more of the lip to vibrate and can help a stronger player play with greater volume and flexibility. The contour of the rim can be wider or narrower, flatter or more rounded, or have a reverse peak. Generally, wider flatter rims provide better endurance and thinner, more rounded rims allow greater flexibility.

Next, the cup and throat should compliment the instrument. The key here is the venturi, the narrowest point at the beginning of the mouthpipe. Large bell horns like Conn 8D’s have a slower overall taper and the venturi is quite small. Medium bell instruments, like Alexanders, start larger and have a much quicker taper. So, what’s needed is balance. 8D’s work well with large throat mouthpieces that balance the small venturi. Alex’s need smaller throats to perform well. Generally, mouthpiece throats in the 10-16 range work well for most people.

The shape of the cup affects sound quality and response. More curved, cup shaped side walls make a brighter sound and work well with both large bore instruments and some smaller horns, like Alex’s, Paxmans, and Yamahas. Deeper, straighter sided cups have a darker, less focused sound quality and work well with Geyer-style instruments. Shallower, more cup shaped mouthpieces favor higher harmonics, deeper, straight sided mouthpiece favor the lower register.

There just isn’t one mouthpiece that will work for all players, all instruments, all music. When you settle on a mouthpiece be aware of its basic design and dimensions. Then, if you want to make a change, you will be starting from a known quantity and you can be systematic in your search. No mouthpiece is perfect, the question is: “Does this mouthpiece help me move in the direction I want to go?”

E. Schmid Rims for Screw Rim Mouthpieces

Schmid_rim

As Engelbert Schmid’s mouthpieces have become increasingly popular, a lot of our customers have asked for Schmid rims to use with Osmun cups. so, we now have two Engelbert Schmid copy rims. All four standard sizes are available as metric rims and the smaller sizes (17, 17.5mm)  are made for standard (Giardinelli thread) cups as well. Here are the rim sizes for Schmid’s mouthpieces:

  • 17mm-Schmid models 4 thru 6.5
  • 17.5mm-Schmid models 7 thru 9.5
  • 18mm- Schmid models 10 thru 12.5
  • 18.5-Schmid models 13 thru 13.5

We also have Schmid Digital rims in 17.5 and 18mm, as used on Schmid Digital mouthpiece models 1 thru 3.5, available as metric rims (fits our metric and Paxman Halstead Chidell cups).

You can see our full range of cups and rims on our mouthpiece page at osmun.com.

Schmid Horns New Website

Engelbert Schmid valve block and flare with garland

Here’s a nice shot of a Schmid valve cluster and a bell flare with nickel silver garland. The ports between the valves have a gentle curve and there are no solder joints to interfere with the airflow. Schmid’s garland is narrower than most and has an oak-leaf motif. Garlands can also be made in yellow or gold brass.

Engelbert Schmid horns has just launched a new website: www.engelbert-schmid-horns.com (Easy to remember, harder to type.) It’s been completely redesigned and organized and has a lot of information and pictures. It shows the full range od Schmid modern horns, baroque and classical hand horns, and Wagner tubas.

Our next Schmid horn is due in late January. It’s a full double, yellow brass, lacquer, two water keys, adjustable hand rest, and your choice of bell flare. (All our Schmid horns come with detachable bell.)  Give us a call  (978-823-0580) or an email if you’re interested.

Welcome to the Club!

Horn Tech Jim Engele with Ed Shenk

Osmun Music horn tech Jim Engele with Ed Shenk and his new Engelbert Schmid double horn

We’re pleased to welcome Ed Shenk as our newest Engelbert Schmid horn owner. Ed’s retired from an engineering career at Polaroid. He currently plays in local amateur ensembles and in a horn quartet. I know the horn will get a lot of good use!

Ed’s passion though, is resurrecting classic horn quartet music. He’s transcribed, edited, and published all 136 of the Gumbert quartets as well as others by Dauprat and Javault and various duets and trios.

Mute Crib

Ed’s Mute Crib holds two mutes and folds flat .

Interestingly, he’s transposed everything into F and includes an alternate fourth part for euphonium. He also makes a gadget called a “Mute Crib” that holds two mutes within easy reach . All the music is available on his website: at http://www.cadtronix.com. Be sure to check it out.

Nickel-free Option for Schmid Horns

Engelbert Schmid is offering a new option, nickel-free components.  For people with allergies to nickel, playing the horn can present problems, form rashes to blisters to illness. Now you can order your Schmid with nickel-free levers, hand guards, and mouthpipe parts (guard, ferrule). This is usually enough to prevent nickel allergies. If that doesn’t do it, Schmid also has the capacity to build a completely nickel-free instrument. Here’s a link to a page about Schmid’s nickel-free horn.